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Steering Committee
Co-Chair:Stanley Fahn, MD
Co-Chair:A. Jon Stoessl, CM, MD, FRCPC

Judy Blazer, MS
David Burn, MD, FRCP
Patricia Davies
Günther Deuschl, MD
Robin Elliott
Marian Emr
Joyce Gordon
Tom Isaacs
Joseph Jankovic, MD
Knut-Johan Onarheim
Ryuji Kaji, MD, PhD
Anne-Louise Lafontaine, MD, MSc
C. Warren Olanow, MD
Michel Panisset, MD, Dea
Gianni Pezzoli , MD
Werner Poewe, MD
Serge Przedborski, MD, PhD
Amy Comstock Rick, JD
Matthew Stern, MD
Michael Schwarzschild, MD, PhD
Erik Wolters, MD, PhD
Marjie Zacks




Dr. Jon Stoessl, Professor and Head of Neurology and Director of the Pacific Parkinson's Research Centre and National Parkinson Foundation Centre of Excellence at UBC and Vancouver Coastal Health and been tapped to co-chair the third World Parkinson Congress. He holds a Tier 1 Canada Research Chair in Parkinson's Disease and directs the CIHR Team in Parkinson's and a Pacific Alzheimer Research Foundation Centre grant on Overlap Syndromes Resulting in Dementia.

When asked about his appointment as co-chair, he said, "I am delighted to co-chair the third World Parkinson Congress and look forward to an outstanding program and experience for the delegates who join us in Montreal, Canada in October 2013. I expect the WPC 2013 to follow the success of the first two Congresses with a high caliber scientific program designed to bring the community together and to build excitement around the latest research from both basic and clinical scientists as well as rehab specialists. I also see this as the perfect space to highlight ongoing programs that are helping people with Parkinson's take charge of their lives and live more independently. Working together as a community, we can make advances more quickly. I expect the WPC 2013 to draw record numbers because of the excitement generated in Glasgow and because of the beauty and charm of Montreal. I look forward to welcoming delegates to Canada."

Dr. Stoessl has worked closely with the Parkinson Society Canada as their past Chair of the Scientific Advisory Board for and is well respected among his peers and the community of people living with Parkinson's across Canada. When she learned of Dr. Stoessl's co-chair position, Joyce Grodon, President and CEO of Parkison Society Canada said, "Dr. Stoessl is a recognized leader in the Canadian and International Parkinson community and Parkinson Society Canada is delighted to have him at the helm with Dr. Fahn for WPC 2013."

Dr. Stoessl sits on the editorial boards of numerous journal and has served on a number of scientific advisory boards, including Canadian Institutes of Health Research, Ontario Mental Health Foundation (Chair), Huntington Society of Canada, Tourette Syndrome Association and National Parkinson Foundation. and currently chairs the Interdisciplinary Adjudication Committee of the Canada Research Chairs program. In 2007, he was appointed a Member of the Order of Canada . Dr. Stoessl's research involves the use of positron emission tomography to study Parkinson's disease and related disorders, including the use of imaging as a biomarker, the basis for complications of treatment and mechanisms of the placebo effect. He has published more than 220 papers and book chapters.


Dr. Stanley Fahn, founder and President of the World Parkinson Coalition, and co-chair of the first two World Parkinson Congresses, will stay on board as co-chair of the WPC 2013.

When asked about this role with the WPC, he said, "I am honored and pleased to co-chair the third World Parkinson Congress with Dr. Stoessl. I look forward to seeing the WPC 2013 expand beyond what the first two WPCs offered to make the experience for delegates as rich as possible with opportunities to learn about the latest science and to meet a wider array of members of the Parkinson's community than they would find at any other Parkinson's meeting today. Allowing people with PD, neuroscientists, rehab specialists, clinicians and others to interact with each other is such a special experience and one that many delegates will remember for years following the Congress. The enthusiasm and "buzz” generated by people with Parkinsons at the first two Congresses made those events extremely exciting. I expect the same at WPC2013, and I am delighted to be a part of this Congress and look forward to seeing many familiar and new faces in Montreal in October 2013.”

Dr. Fahn is the H. Houston Merritt Professor of Neurology and Director of the Center for Parkinson's Disease and Other Movement Disorders at Columbia University Medical Center . He is the Past-President of the American Academy of Neurology (AAN). He founded the Movement Disorder Society and served as the Chairman of its Steering Committee and was elected its first president. He was the founding co editor of the journal Movement Disorders, and also served as Associate Editor of Neurology for 10 years.

Dr. Fahn has twice served as Chairman of the Advisory Committee on Peripheral and Central Nervous System Drugs for the Food and Drug Administration. He currently serves on an NIH Oversight Committee to review and give advice on clinical trials on neuroprotection for PD. Dr. Fahn and his scientific colleagues at Columbia University were awarded a Morris K. Udall Parkinson's Disease Research Center of Excellence by the National Institutes of Health in 1999, and it is currently ongoing. Dr. Fahn organized and executed the development of the Unified Parkinson's Disease Rating Scale (UPDRS) and modified and popularized the use of the Schwab England ADL score for global severity of this disease. Both of these rating scores are used worldwide, the former to determine the severity of PD, and the latter as a measure of quality of life. He has participated in many clinical trials of a variety of pharmacotherapeutic agents for PD.

Along with Dr. Ira Shoulson; Dr. Fahn was a co founder of the Parkinson Study Group (PSG), a consortium of clinical investigators dedicated to conduct controlled clinical trials on the prevention and treatment of Parkinson's disease. He has received numerous honors and delivered many titled lectures at a variety of universities around the world.

Judy Blazer, MS, CCMEP (US) is the Executive Director of WE MOVE. She has been with WE MOVE since its inception in 1991 and has functioned as Executive Director since 1994. Ms. Blazer earned her Bachelor's Degree in health education from New York University, and her Master's Degree from Columbia University, School of Dental and Oral Surgery. Ms. Blazer combined a career of healthcare administrationwith a teaching position at Columbia SDOS for over 15 years. Utilizing her experience in health care delivery, education, marketing, communications, and administration, Ms. Blazer has overseen WE MOVE's evolution from a small, University-based program, to an internationally recognized and highly respected not-for-profit organization. WE MOVE is an accredited provider of continuing medical education (CME) recognized for its collaborative philosophy and innovative efforts in addressing misdiagnosis in neurology. WE MOVE is the only not-for-profit organization that provides medical and scientific information about all movement disorders to patients and their families as well as healthcare professionals. Ms. Blazer, a recognized leader in the movement disorder community, has served on numerous committees and advisory boards of not-for-profit organizations including the American Academy of Neurology/Movement Disorder Society Planning Committee for regional CME courses; American Academy of Neurology, Subcommittee on the Education of the Non-Neurologist; American Society for Experimental NeuroTherapeutics (ASENT) Advocacy Task Force; Child NeurologyFoundation, Subcommittee for Advocacy Relations; Easter Seals, Spasticity National Advisory Board; and American Academy of Cerebral Palsy & Developmental Medicine, Continuing Education Committee.

David Burn, MD, FRCP

Patricia Davies (USA) has been a professional conference organizer (PCO) for about 35 years. She originally worked in the private sector in London, and before moving to the US in 1991 was managing director of Conference Associates and Services Ltd., a company which specialized in the organization of large international conferences, primarily medical. In 1991 she moved to Washington DC to take up a position with the World Bank Group and the International Monetary Fund as manager of the office which organizes the organizations’ Annual and Spring meetings. She retired from this position in 2007 and was diagnosed with Parkinson’s disease early in 2009.

On the assumption that keeping as active as possible keeps the disease at bay, or at the very least is a distraction, Pat is now involved with many different non profit organizations. Until recently she was Chair of Children of Uganda, which supports several hundred orphans and vulnerable children in Uganda. She is currently helping to organize the Tour of Light, when a group of the children will travel to the US in January/February 2012 for a fundraising tour featuring African song and dance. She is on the board of Georgetown Ministry Center which provides services for homeless people in DC, and she leads a knitting group for the homeless, prepares lunch for them at least once a week, and is organizing a three week winter shelter. With the dog that she adopted to ensure she gets out and walks several times a day, she (and the dog) volunteer at People Animals Love (PAL) in the Reading with Dogs program, designed to help children improve their reading skills. Soon after her diagnosis Pat joined a Parkinson’s Support Group and participated in a couple of clinical studies at UMD. She organized a team to participate in the recent National Parkinson Foundation Moving Day, and the "Movers and Shakers” raised over $8,000. She attended the 2010 WPC in Glasgow and offered her services to assist. She was thrilled to be invited to join the Steering Committee of the 2013 WPC, and is equally delighted to be invited to join the Advocates Committee. She looks forward to working with other members of the Parkinson’s Community, and has a particular interest in resources for individuals who are coping with the disease alone.

Günther Deuschl, MD

Robin Elliott

Marian Emr

Joyce Gordon

Tom Isaacs (UK) was diagnosed with Parkinson's at the young age of 27 and since then has done everything he can to raise funds, heighten awareness and find a cure for the condition which is perceived by many as a condition affecting the elderly alone.

Having completed his highly successful 1,250-mile sponsored walk in 1999, Tom left his job as Director of a London property company in April 2002 to undertake his Coastin' challenge. By April 2003, Tom had walked 4,500 miles around the British coastline, climbed the highest mountains in England, Scotland and Wales and run the Flora London Marathon, raising over £350,000. In 2004 he was runner-up in the GMTV/Daily Mirror Fundraiser of the Year Award and in 2005 he was elected Charity Personality of the Year. A year later he co-founded The Cure Parkinson’s Trust, an organization of which he is President and which has since gone on to raise over £5.5 million and has been involved in funding and facilitating ground breaking research in Parkinson’s.

Tom was a Board Member of the European Parkinson’s Disease Association from 2005 until 2010. He also represents the interests of people with Parkinson’s on DeNDRoN (the Dementias and Neurodegenerative Diseases Research Network). Tom acted as the patient representative on the Steering Committee for the World Parkinson Congress 2010 organizational committee and continues in this role for the 2013 Congress. At the 2010 Congress he made nine presentations to a variety of audiences. He is also a leading contributor to the SENSE-PARK project, which is a European funded initiative to establish a more personalized, objective measuring device for people with Parkinson’s and those who treat them.

Tom has written a book "Shake Well Before Use” about his walk and his experiences with Parkinson’s, which he conveys with passion, optimism and humor. He speaks regularly about his condition and the ability of people with Parkinson’s to inject urgency into progressing the delivery of new therapies to the clinic.

Joseph Jankovic, MD (US) received his Medical Degree at the University of Arizona, Dr. Jankovic completed medicine internship at Baylor College of Medicine, Houston in 1974. He subsequently completed residency in Neurology at the Neurological Institute, Columbia University, New York City, where he was selected as the Chief Resident. While there he obtained additional training in movement disorders with Stanley Fahn, MD. In 1977 he joined the faculty of Baylor College of Medicine and established the Parkinson's Disease Center and Movement Disorders Clinic (PDCMDC). The PDCMDC has been recognized as a "Center of Excellence" by the National Parkinson Foundation and the Huntington Disease Society of America. Promoted to a full professor of Neurology in 1988, Dr. Jankovic holds the endowed Baylor College of Medicine Distinguished Chair in Movement Disorders.

Dr. Jankovic has published over 700 original articles and chapters and has edited or co-edited 35 books and volumes, including several standard textbooks such as "Neurology in Clinical Practice” (NICP.com) and "Parkinson's Disease and Movement Disorders” (along with a video atlas), both currently in 5 th edition. Dr. Jankovic, along with Dr. Fahn, co-authored a comprehensive book (and DVD) entitled "Principles and Practice of Movement Disorders”, published in 2007.

Knut-Johan Onarheim

Ryuji Kaji, MD, PhD (Japan) is Professor and Chairman of the Department of Neurology at Tokushima University , Graduate School of Medicine, Tokushima, Japan . H e has been a member of The Movement Disorder Society (MDS) since 199 1 and has served on the MDS Membership and Congress Scientific Program Committee s, as well as on the Editorial Board of Movement Disorders journal.

Dr. Kaji received neurology and neurophysiology training at the University of Pennsylvania and completed a movement disorders training course at the Kyoto University Hospital. His research interests have been focused on the study of pathophysiology, molecular genetics, and functional neuroanatomy of dystonia, especially those of lubag dystonia.

Anne-Louise Lafontaine, MD, MSc (Canada) has an MD from McMaster University and MSc- biostatistics and epidemiology from McGill University. She completed her residency in neurology at McGill University and went on to do a fellowship in movement disorders at the University of Calgary, Alberta. She has a strong interest in education and ethics and is currently the program director for the neurology residency training at McGill University as well as the co-chair of the research ethics board of the Montreal Neurological Hospital. Dr. Lafontaine has been very involved in the Parkinson Society Canada as a member of the board, chair of the research policy committee and currently maintains her membership on the research policy committee. She is the Director of the McGill Movement Disorder clinic.

C. Warren Olanow, MD

Michel Panisset, MD, Dea (Canada) is currently Professor of Medicine at the Université de Montréal, associate member at the Montral Neurological Hospital and head of Neurology at CHUM. He is co-Director of the André-Barbeau Movement Disorders Clinic of CHUM and co-director of the McGill-University of Montréal Movement disorder functional surgery program. Dr Panisset and his team care for near 5000 patients with Parkinson disease and other movement disorders and the surgical program has allowed near 250 patients to receive deep brain stimulation.

He received his MD degree from the Université de Montréal and trained in neurology at the University of Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania. He further specialized in movement disorders and dementia at INSERM, Paris, France and then at McGill University, Montréal. He obtained a Diplôme d'Études Approfondies (DEA) in neuropsyhology at the Université Claude Bernard in Lyon, France.

Gianni Pezzoli , MD

Werner Poewe, MD (Austria) is a Professor of Neurology and the Director of the Department of Neurology at Innsbruck Medical University in Innsbruck, Austria. He held a Residency in Clinical Neurology and Psychiatry at the University of Innsbruck, Austria, from 1977 to 1984. Then, Professor Poewe was a British Council Research Fellow at University College and Middlesex Hospital Medical School, London. For three years (1986-1989), he was a Senior Lecturer in the Department of Neurology at the University of Innsbruck, Austria. From 1990 through 1994 he served as Professor of Neurology and Acting Director of the Department of Neurology at the Virchow Hospital of the Free University of Berlin. Professor Poewe's main research interests are in the field of movement disorders with particular emphasis on the clinical pharmacology of Parkinson's disease and dystonia. He has authored and co-authored more than 400 original articles and reviews in the field of movement disorders. He served as President of the International Movement Disorder Society from 2000 through 2002, as President of the Austrian Society of Neurology from 2002 to 2004 and is the current President of the Austrian Parkinson's Disease Society.

Serge Przedborski, MD, PhD is the Page and William Black Professor of Neurology. He holds a joint appointment in the Departments of Neurology, Pathology and Cell Biology and is the Co-Director of the Center for Motor Neuron Biology and Disease and a faculty member of the Center for Parkinson's disease (PD) and Other Movement Disorders at Columbia University. Dr. Przedborski attended medical school at the Université Libre de Bruxelles (ULB), Belgium, and did his internship and residency in Neurology and Psychiatry at the ULB-Erasme Academic Medical Center, Belgium. He then did a fellowship in movement disorders with Dr. Stanley Fahn at Columbia University, where he became Assistant Professor of Neurology in 1991. The research conducted in Dr. Przedborski's laboratory is geared toward unraveling the molecular basis of neurodegeneration and devising therapeutic strategies to hamper the processes that cause neuronal death, the source of many debilitating disorders. In keeping with this goal, to what extent and by which mechanisms do cell-autonomous and non-cell autonomous deleterious processes contribute to the demise of specific subpopulation of neurons in neurodegenerative disorders, such as PD represent a main line of research in his laboratory. These research efforts are supported by federal grants from both NIH and the DoD and by private agencies including the Parkinson's Disease Foundation, the Thomas Hartman Foundation, and MDA's Wings Over Wall Street. Dr. Przedborski is a Senior Editor for the Journal of Neuroscience and an Associate Editor of Movement Disorders.

Amy Comstock Rick, JD

Matthew Stern, MD

Michael Schwarzschild, MD, PhD serves as Chair of the Executive Committee of the Parkinson Study Group (PSG), a consortium of clinical investigators, coordinators and allied professionals dedicated to improving the lives of people with Parkinson's through the conduct clinical trials and research of the highest quality. The PSG comprises over 120 credentialed clinical sites in the US and Canada, and is working with counterparts around the world to develop a highly trained, flexible global network for PD trials. Dr. Schwarzschild, an Associate Professor of Neurology at Harvard Medical School, also directs the Molecular Neurobiology Laboratory at Massachusetts General Hospital, focusing on the role of purines -- including adenosine, inosine, caffeine and urate — in mouse models of PD. Benefitting from interdisciplinary collaborations across basic, epidemiological and clinical neurosicences he is working to advance neurobiological insights to disease-modifying antiparkinsonian therapies.

Erik Wolters, MD, PhD

Marjie Zacks
(Canada)


 
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